Tag Archives: debris flow

Our Games at NERC #UnEarthed2017 17-19 November 2017

Last year we took our Flash Flood! game to the NERC Science Showcase, Into the blue. We had an amazing time, and you guys seem to as well as we were voted as one of the most popular exhibits. Read about what we got up to here, and also check out our article in NERC’s magazine Planet Earth.

We are very excited therefore to be returning for this year’s NERC science showcase, UnEarthed, held at the Dynamic Earth centre in Edinburgh. You can find more details on their website – tickets for the public days are free.

The stand this year, Keeping Back the Floods, is organised by the Energy and Environment Institute, University of Hull. It features two of our popular Virtual Reality games – Flash Flood! and TideBox (formerly Humber in a Box) – and will let you get hands on with the cutting-edge of flood risk science and the latest in gaming technology.

 

 

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Flash Flood! YouTube Now Online! #Isurvivedtheflashflood

We are very, very excited to be able to unleash our YouTube version of Flash Flood!

You can view this on a PC, but it’s best viewed using a phone or tablet where the motion tracking allows you to easily view the full 360 view. If you have a cardboard headset, such like our #ISurvivedTheFlashFlood VISRs, then hit the goggles icon on the video, stick you phone in and try the Flash Flood! VR experience yourself. It’s even better with headphones.

The #ISurvivedTheFlashFlood VISR VR Headsets – the ideal way to view Flash Flood! on YouTube

Do keep your eyes on our Twitter, Facebook and this blog – we hope to release more YouTube videos like this in the near future, as well as support to use this is the classroom.

If you want a copy of our full game version, it is now free to download on SourceForge.

Finally, thank you NERC for the funding, and thank you BetaJester for the development.

Grab your copy of Flash Flood! – Register as a SeriousGeoGamer

The goal of SeriousGeoGames is to explore the use of games, and gaming technology, to enhance the teaching, research and communication of earth sciences. As such, we don’t want to keep our games to ourselves, but rather want to share them as widely as possible.

To that end, we are inviting you to become a registered SeriousGeoGamer – simply contact us at seriousgeogames(@)gmail.com and provide us with the following details –

  • Your name
  • Your institution, school, company etc.
  • Your position
  • How you intend to use the applications

In return, we will send you a link from where you can download the software and guidance notes. (Please note, if you wish to use this on a network you will need to get permission to install 3rd-Party software)

By becoming a user, you agree to use it only for non-commercial activities, and we also want to hear from you about how it goes. Any stories or pictures we can share on our Twitter or Facebook Page are particularly welcome.

Living Manual

Next Stop #NERCIntoTheBlue – 25-29 October, Manchester

It’s just a little over two weeks until we’ll be heading to Manchester for the Into the Blue event, organised by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). NERC are major funders of scientific research in the UK, and SeriousGeoGames will be at the event with the NERC-funded project Flash Flooding from Intense Rainfall (the FFIR project).

25-29 October 2016 –nerc-intothebluev2 The Runway Visitor Park, Manchester Airport – more information and tickets here.

 

 

 

 

The FFIR project aims to improve our ability to forecast flash flood events – this is currently difficult as the thunderstorms which typically cause them rapidly form, only cover small areas, and only last a short time. It is important as this type of flooding can be particularly devastating, and by its nature can occur rapidly with little warning.

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At Into the Blue we will be taking three (yes, three!) sets of kit to run virtual reality demonstrations of Flash Flood! – come and see us and explore the virtual river valley, observing just like a real environmental scientist. Witness the destruction that flash flooding can cause, and chat to the research scientists from the FFIR project.

More details about Flash Flood!, its development and the science behind, can be found on its section of the website, here.

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The event is great whatever age you are, but is especially great for school-aged children. It will feature over 40 exhibits of cutting-edge environmental science all under the wings of Concorde. There will also be the chance to win a tour of the FAAM Research Aircraft (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement).

FFIR Scientists at Into the Blue – 

Professor Tom Coulthard (Geomorphologist) – University of Hull (@Tom_Coulthard)

Dr Chris Skinner (Geomorphologist) – University of Hull (@CloudSkinner)

Dr Rob Thompson (Meteorologist) – University of Reading (@R0b1et)

Dr Matt Perks (Geomorphologist) – Newcastle University (@CatchmentSci)

David Flack (Meteorologist) – University of Reading (@MetBirder)

Chloe Morris (Geomorphologist) – University of Hull (@ChloeMorris_13)

Latest News – New Rift, Freedom Festival, BSG, Into the Blue, and Digital Awards

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for SeriousGeoGames. A few weeks ago we finally got hold of the brand new Oculus Rift and, thanks to the excellent BetaJester, we have Flash Flood! running in Virtual Reality – we’re biased, of course, but it is truly awesome!

The second bit of news is about your first chance to try it – we’re very happy to have been invited back to Hull’s premier arts and cultural festival, the Freedom Festival, as part of the University of Hull science exhibits in Queen’s Gardens. You will be able to try Flash Flood! VR during the day on Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th September 2016. There will be lots of other great exhibits, and speakers for Soapbox Science.

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Chris demonstrating Humber in a Box at Freedom Festival 2015.

We immediately pack up the kit and get on a train to Plymouth for the annual meeting of the British Society for Geomorphology. Chris Skinner will be demonstrating the application and will also be presenting a talk on the science behind Flash Flood!.

Our next event will be the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) event, Into the Blue at the end of October. We’re really looking forward to this and will hopefully have several sets of kit running Flash Flood! underneath the wings of a Concorde – there will be numerous scientists from the Flash Flooding from Intense Rainfall project on hand to talk about their research (as well as the other 47 exhibits and tours of a research aircraft) – we will post more details soon!

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#NERCIntoTheBlue – A Science Festival under the wings of Concorde!

Finally, but by no means least, we are very pleased to say we have been shortlisted for a Hull and East Yorkshire Digital Award in the Best Use of Technology within Education category. Chris Skinner, Chloe Morris and John van Rij have recorded a small piece for the awards ceremony and we hope to show you that in the near future.

Phew! I think you’re up to date now.

 

Flash Flood! Desktop – Official Launch March 10th 2016

We are very happy to announce we will be launching Flash Flood! Desktop officially on March 10th 2016, at the Early Career Researchers meeting of the NERC-funded Flash Flooding from Intense Rainfall (FFIR) project.

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Flash Flood! was designed to act as an outreach tool for the NERC-FFIR project, and was funded by the project’s Public Engagement fund.

The application places a user inside a virtual river valley as it experiences a catastrophic flash flood. The flood causes massive changes to the geomorphology of the river through processes of erosion and deposition, changing the shape of the river, stripping out plants and trees, and even moving boulders. This is all based on a real event that happened in 2007 on a small river in the uplands of the North of England.

The Flash Flood! virtual valley (left) and Thinhope Burn on which it is based (right)

The Flash Flood! valley is built using data collected by geomorphologists (scientists who seek to understand the changing shapes of the planet’s surface) in the field, both before and after the actual flash flood event, and the animation of the flooding is based on results of computer modelling.

It is expected in the Summer of 2016 that Flash Flood! VR will be available once the latest Oculus Rift and Oculus-Ready PCs have been shipped.

Copies of the software can be made available freely by registering as a user – do this by emailing the SeriousGeoGames (at gmail dot com) Gmail account. We will be progressively adding supporting materials and class guides alongside the software.

Flash Flood! Our new project with @BetaJesterLtd #MadewithUnity

We are pleased to announce that we have started working with developers from BetaJester on our latest project, Flash Flood!

Flash Flood! is being produced as part of the Flash Flooding from Intense Rainfall (FFIR) research programme, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and is designed to highlight the destructive power of flash floods. This work has taken particular significance in light of the recent flooding in the UK over December.

Flash Flood! will use the latest Oculus Rift headsets, only available on pre-order this week, and is built using the Unity-3D gaming engine. The virtual reality experience will allow you to explore a pristine river valley, and soak up the sun by its pleasant and gentle stream. This changes with the weather, as an intense convective storm darkens the skies and heavy rainfall falls on the upper headlands of the valley. This triggers landslides, cascading debris into the river, trapping flood water before it bursts down the river, swelling the gentle stream into a raging torrent.

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The river valley before  the storm

The river flow, full of stones, rocks, trees and other debris strips the river banks of its plants, and changes the nature of the river and its valley. After surviving the storm, you can then explore the river valley once more and see for yourself the changes it underwent in just a few hours of flooding.

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The river valley after the storm (trees to be added)

The images in this post are very early development screenshots and we think they look great. They are built from data collected in the field and based on an actual flash flood event – we’ll be updating our website shortly to give more details on this.

We’re really excited about Flash Flood! and hope to be bringing to an event near you soon!