Tag Archives: beta

What’s coming up? Lots!

Ok, I’ll admit, we’ve been a little quiet of late. But that doesn’t mean we haven’t been busy working on new games to fascinate and entertain you at future events.

At the NERC science showcase, Into the blue, we won one of the four prizes and this has allowed to develop Flash Flood! further. We’ll be using the prize to make interactive YouTube walk-throughs of the game meaning anyone with an internet connection can try it, and using a cardboard headset can even get a sense of the VR.

matt-itb

Dr Matt Perks – @catchmentsci – demonstrating Flash Flood! at Into the blue

Last September we began working with students from SEED Software on two (yes, two!) projects. The first is a rebuild of Humber in a Box, making it smoother and more intuitive – this new iteration of the game will be called TideBox, focussing on the science of estuaries more generally than just the Humber (although the Humber still features prominently).

Development shots from Defend the City

The second is our most ambitious project yet – Defend the City. The games uses the CAESAR-Lisflood model to simulate the flooding in our town, Uncanny Valley. The player(s) get to build in their own flood defences on the attractive 3D environment, and then see just how successful they have been. It will be used during workshops, and will convey two key issues of flood defence –

  1. You can never eliminate flood risk completely
  2. Flood Managers have to strike a balance of cost and benefit with any scheme

We hope to debut all three of these projects at Hull Science Festival, April 2-4 2017. It is free but you will need to pre-book some activities.

Finally, if you want learn more about the Humber, its landscape and how it has inspired poetry, you can hear SeriousGeoGamer Chris Skinner on the Radio 4 Seriously… Podcast ‘I, by the Tide of Humber‘.

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The Origins of TideBox (aka Humber in a Box)

You may know it as Humber in a Box but because we have big plans for the application we are changing the name to TideBox Beta. Whatever the name, TideBox has come from very humble beginnings.

Humber in a Box 1

VR view of TideBox Beta

It all began in the first couple of weeks of my first job after my thesis submission. I was working as a part-time Research Assistant for a project called Dynamic Humber, and my job was to use the CAESAR-Lisflood model to simulate long-term development of the Humber Estuary.

This was half a year before the storm surge of December 5th 2013 and flooding was not on the radar for the research programme – instead we were trying to crack modelling the sediment processes in the Estuary. The model is designed for rivers primarily, so needed to be adapted and tested for use in tidal conditions. I was continuing the work of Jorge Ramirez, and even now this work is ongoing with PhD candidate Chloe Morris leading the charge.

I was asked to present the Dynamic Humber project to the public at the Hull Science Showcase, the forerunner of the massively popular Hull Science Festival. I had no experience of science outreach at all, and only two weeks in the job – with the help of my colleague Sally Little (we were the Dynamic (Humber) Duo), we produced a poster and a short video detailing the programme. They were bad and a great example of how not to do public engagement.

Recently though, the “On This Day” feature on Facebook did trawl up a long forgotten memory for me – part of the video featured an ArcGIS fly through of the Humber Estuary data we were using for the model, including the Humber Bridge towers (very much not to scale). It took a few attempts to fly between the towers! I guess this was the initial inception of what would become Humber in a Box, and hopefully TideBox.

Thanks for reading,

Chris