Monthly Archives: May 2016

The Origins of TideBox (aka Humber in a Box)

You may know it as Humber in a Box but because we have big plans for the application we are changing the name to TideBox Beta. Whatever the name, TideBox has come from very humble beginnings.

Humber in a Box 1

VR view of TideBox Beta

It all began in the first couple of weeks of my first job after my thesis submission. I was working as a part-time Research Assistant for a project called Dynamic Humber, and my job was to use the CAESAR-Lisflood model to simulate long-term development of the Humber Estuary.

This was half a year before the storm surge of December 5th 2013 and flooding was not on the radar for the research programme – instead we were trying to crack modelling the sediment processes in the Estuary.┬áThe model is designed for rivers primarily, so needed to be adapted and tested for use in tidal conditions. I was continuing the work of Jorge Ramirez, and even now this work is ongoing with PhD candidate Chloe Morris leading the charge.

I was asked to present the Dynamic Humber project to the public at the Hull Science Showcase, the forerunner of the massively popular Hull Science Festival. I had no experience of science outreach at all, and only two weeks in the job – with the help of my colleague Sally Little (we were the Dynamic (Humber) Duo), we produced a poster and a short video detailing the programme. They were bad and a great example of how not to do public engagement.

Recently though, the “On This Day” feature on Facebook did trawl up a long forgotten memory for me – part of the video featured an ArcGIS fly through of the Humber Estuary data we were using for the model, including the Humber Bridge towers (very much not to scale). It took a few attempts to fly between the towers! I guess this was the initial inception of what would become Humber in a Box, and hopefully TideBox.

Thanks for reading,

Chris

Flash Flood! Living Manual Update + The GA Conference

We’ve recently made a small update to the Living Manual for Flash Flood! Desktop, providing a brief description and background to the July 17th 2007 flash flood from intense rainfall event at Thinhope Burn. Included is a map of the area, hyetographs of the event, before and after Google Earth images, plus a description of landscape sensitivity theory. All this information will be very useful if you plan on using Flash Flood! in your classroom.

We’ve also made is simpler to download the software, please follow these steps –

  1. Register yourself by emailing us at seriousgeogames@gmail.com providing us your name, where you are (company/institution/school etc) and how you intend to use the software.
  2. You will be sent a link to a OneDrive folder
  3. Download the “setup.exe” file
  4. Double-click the downloaded file and follow the installation
  5. Enjoy!
  6. Don’t forget to give us your feedback – we greatly appreciate your thoughts

The Geographical Association Annual Meeting 2016, Manchester

Lynda Yorke and Chris Skinner on the stand for the British Society for Geomorphology

In other news, we were very pleased to support the British Society for Geomorphology with their stand at the annual meeting of the Geographical Association. We got to show the software to lots of teachers, demonstrating the importance of Geomorphology to flooding. Many expressed interest in using the software, and you can get hold of it following the steps above.